Explore a mystical land shaped by fire and ice on this excursion to the ancient Viking stronghold of Iceland. Voyaging aboard the Ocean Endeavour, you’ll see Iceland at its best and most diverse. Marvel at the geological wonders of this island at the edge of the Arctic Circle, exploring its unforgettable culture, history, and people—from small fishing communities to the ancient and modern capital, Reykjavík.

Contact us about this trip

Special Offer

Save 15% for double occupancy on select cabin categories if you book by April 15, 2019!

• Valid on new bookings only
• Not available on group bookings
• Cannot be combined with other offers
• TravelWild reserves the right to limit, change or discontinue this offer without notice

 

Starting from $4,495

Rates & Dates Prices are per person and shown in USD.

Category 1 QuadCategory 2 TripleCategory 3 Interior TwinCategory 4 Exterior TwinCategory 5 Main TwinCategory 6 Comfort TwinCategory 7 Select TwinCategory 8 Superior TwinCategory 9 - Junior SuiteCategory 10 - Suite
Jul 5, 2019 - Jul 14, 2019$4,495
 
$5,495
 
$6,895
$5,861
$8,195
$6,966
$9,495
$8,071
$10,795
$9,176
$12,095
$10,281
$13,395
$11,386
$14,695
$12,491
$15,995
$13,596

Itinerary

Days 1 – 2: Reykjavík

Reykjavik, or “steamy bay” is a cosmopolitan capital city and as much a part of the Icelandic experience as volcanoes, glaciers, and the midnight sun. Entirely powered by geothermal energy harnessed from the Earth, the city boast crisp, clean, and pollution free air, as well as thermally heated streets and sidewalks. It is among the cleanest, greenest, and safest cities in the world, and is believed to be the location of the first permanent settlement in Iceland, established in AD 874. The Culture House, which opened in 1909, was originally built to house the National Library and National Archives of Iceland; in 2000, it was remodeled to promote Icelandic national heritage, including treasures like the Poetic Edda, and the Norse Sagas in their original manuscripts. Here, we embark the Ocean Endeavour. We depart Reykjavik in the evening.

Day 3: Stykkishólmur

This area is often called "Iceland in Miniature" because of its diverse landscapes. These include bird-rich  Breidafjördur Bay and the Snaefellsjökull glacier, sitting atop the dormant volcano that was featured in Jules Verne’s Journey to the Center of the Earth. Stykkishólmur is the region’s namesake community, home to a natural harbour ideal for fishing. The first trading post here was established in the late sixteenth century. The nearby mountain of Helgafell is the burial place of Guðrún Ósvífursdóttir, the heroine of the Icelandic saga. The area was featured in the 2013 film The Secret Life of Walter Mitty.

Day 4: Isafjördur

Isafjördur (meaning “ice fjord or fjord of ice”) is an idyllic town in the Westfjords region. Connected to the Icelandic mainland only by a narrow strip of land, this secluded peninsula includes many roadless areas. The landscape includes jaw-dropping views of dramatic fjords carved by ancient glaciers and sheer table mountains that plunge into the sea. Thousands of puffins inhabit tiny Vigur Island, and the splendid Dynjandi waterfall is renowned for its beauty. Fishing has always been Isafjördur’s main industry. It has one of the largest fisheries in Iceland and is home to the University Centre of the Westfjords, which offers two master’s degree programs: one in Coastal & Marine Management, and the other in Marine Innovation. The local folk museum contains the oldest house in Iceland, built in 1734.

Day 5: Siglufjördur & Grimsey

The fjord town of Siglufjördur was once the hub of the global herring industry and is now enjoying a rebirth in popularity. The award-winning Herring Era Museum, located on the vibrant harbourfront, celebrates the golden age of the herring fishery. The town remains dependent on fishing, although the herring population has been depleted. The old mountain road to Siglufjördur—the only connection to the rest of the country before the construction of a tunnel system—is open during the summer. The highest-elevated road in Iceland, it is used today for hiking, horseback riding, and driving.

About forty kilometres off the mainland, Grimsey Island lies on the Arctic Circle, which means that it experiences midnight sun in the summer. With a stunning population of nearly a million seabirds, including puffins, guillemots, and gulls, the island experiences a cacophony of bird calls around the clock as well. Grimsey’s hundred or so inhabitants are served by a ferry three times a week.

Day 6: Akureyri

Iceland’s second-largest urban area, Akureyri is nicknamed the Capital of North Iceland. The relatively mild climate and ice-free harbour have played a significant role in the town’s history since its settlement in the ninth century—including offering a base for Allied units during the Second World War.  The town is surrounded by mountains, which shield it from strong winds. Nearby Lake Myvatn offers stunning contrasts: one side of the lake features rugged volcanic remnants, while the other side is blessed with lush vegetation and varied bird life.

Day 7: Húsavík

On the shores of Skjalfandi Bay lies the town of Húsavík. Often called the "Whale Capital" of Iceland, the local waters are home to fifteen different whale species, as well as dolphins and thirty varieties of birds. The Húsavík Museum is located by the harbor. There are numerous other museums, including the Exploration Museum, which includes artifacts from Apollo astronaut training in the area, as well as a transportation museum, and a turf house museum.

Day 8: Seydisfjördur

The picturesque port of Seydisfjördur is nestled between the sea and steep mountains at the tip of its namesake fjord. The town of seven hundred or so is known among other things for its flourishing art scene. Connected to the Icelandic Ring Road, Seydisfjördur welcomes car ferries from Denmark and the Faroes. The fjord itself is quite remote and is home to a booming puffin colony and ruins of a former church at nearby Vestdallseyri. Local activities include seal-spotting, horseback riding, kayaking, and guided hikes of the Vestadalur area, which features numerous waterfalls.

Day 9: Djupivogur

By the early-nineteenth century, Djúpivogur fishing village in south-east Iceland was a tiny port with a Danish colonial trading base. Hans Jonatan, who had been a slave in Copenhagen, escaped there and became one of Iceland's first people of colour. The village is the starting point for an optional excursion to Vatnajökull glacier. The nearby coastline is defined by three fjords— Berufjörður, Hamarsfjörður, and Álftafjörður. Approximately a kilometre west of the town is a work of art named "Eggin í Gleðivík" (The Eggs of Merry Bay) by Sigurður Guðmundsson, a series of thirty-four large stone replicas of the eggs of local birds.

Day 10: Vestmannaeyjar (Westman Islands)

Vestmannaeyjar lies off the south coast of Iceland and comprises fourteen islands in addition to a number of rocks and skerries. Only the archipelago’s largest island, Heimaey, is inhabited, though several of the outlying islands have small cabins used during the bird-hunting season. Since the early days of Heimaey’s occupation, fishing has been the principal way of life for its inhabitants. Today, the island is home to two large processing plants and a robust freezing and shipping industry, which supplies fish to European markets. Numerous species of seabirds nest in the steep rock faces along the ocean cliffs and high on the bluffs surrounding the island. Highly volcanically active, the area has seen two major eruptions in recent times: the formation of the island of Surtsey in 1963, and the Eldfell eruption ten years later that destroyed much of Heimaey and nearly choked off the harbour with lava.

Day 11: Reykjavík

After breakfast, we bid farewell to the Ocean Endeavour as we sail back into Reykjavík. This dynamic city with its invigorating outdoor activities, great food, and world-class entertainment is the perfect place to cap our journey and reflect on an unforgettable ten days at sea!

Ocean Endeavour Arctic

Ocean Endeavour Arctic

Deckplan & Cabin Photos

Highlights

  • Trace the routes of the Icelandic sagas' heroes
  • Soak up the culture in Reykjavík, one of the cleanest and greenest cities in the world
  • Marvel at bird colonies up to a million strong
  • Explore pristine fjords and volcanic landscapes unlike any on Earth
  • Visit traditional fishing villages dating back more than eight hundred years
  • Search for whales in the rich, productive waters of Húsavík

Included

ABOARD

  • Pre-departure materials
  • The expertise and company of our expedition staff
  • Onboard educational programming
  • Interactive workshops
  • Evening entertainment
  • All shipboard meals, including on deck barbecues & afternoon tea, 24-hour coffee, tea and snacks
  • Hors d’oeuvres & snacks during evening recaps
  • 24-hour documentary and film programming
  • Fully stocked library
  • Nikon Camera Trial Program

ASHORE

  • Introductions to local people and customs
  • Sightseeing
  • Museum entries, park accesses, port taxes
  • Access to pristine wilderness areas
  • Zodiac tours and cruises
  • On-site archaeology workshops
  • Community programming: local performances, presentations, and demonstrations

Not Included:

  • $250 USD Discovery Fund Fee
  • Commercial and charter flight costs
  • Gratuities (suggested at $15 USD per person per day)
  • Bicycle rentals
  • Personal expenses
  • Mandatory medical evacuation insurance
  • Additional expenses in the event of delays or itinerary changes
  • Possible fuel surcharges
  • Pre- and post-trip hotel accommodation
  • Additional costs associated with credit card payment
  • Program enhancements
 

PLEASE NOTE: Due to the nature of expedition cruising, itineraries are subject to change due to weather, ice conditions, natural and cultural events, wildlife viewing opportunities and other logistical considerations. In general, a ship's crew will endeavor to complete the itinerary provided, but the ultimate decision lies with the ship's captain and expedition leaders.

 
 
XML Sitemap